Browse Prior Art Database

Proximity Gesture Support for Pen Input Computer Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116625D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bodin, W: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Described is a hardware implementation to provide pen input type of computer systems with a proximity mode of gesture support. The implementation is designed to increase the effectiveness in distinguishing gesture data type of input from character information.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Proximity Gesture Support for Pen Input Computer Systems

      Described is a hardware implementation to provide pen input
type of computer systems with a proximity mode of gesture support.
The implementation is designed to increase the effectiveness in
distinguishing gesture data type of input from character information.

      Typically, pen input type of computer systems utilize absolute
coordinates for data.  A pen, or pointing device, is placed relative
to a computer screen, or digitizer pad, and the pen input allows for
natural handwriting input functions, such as handwriting, or gesture,
recognition.  The pen input is often used to emulate mouse functions,
such as clicking and dragging operations.

      In prior art, methods of gesture support included using a pause
mechanism to determine if the pen input was to be recognized as a
gesture, or as an emulated mouse input.  In certain operations, such
as Pen for OS2*, when a pen touchdown occurred, the system attempted
to recognize the data as a gesture.  This would occur unless the user
did a pen touchdown, then paused for a defined period of time, and
then moved the pen accordingly.  Therefore, the pause, or lack of a
pause, determined whether the pen input was a gesture, or mouse data.
The Pen for OS/2 allowed options, such as the ability to handle all
pen data as gesture, handwriting, or sketch data, or a combination of
all three, depending on where the data was entered.  The prior art
methods of gesture input used a minimal requirement in that the pen
had to be in the contact state to allow the gesture input.  The
system, or application, determined if the data should be handled as
gesture, handwriting, sketch, or mouse emulation.  The pause, or
button
pressing, distinguished gesture data from other types of pen data.

      The concept described herein improves on prior art methods by
providing a means of distinguishing gesture d...