Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Flash EPROM Overrider

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116691D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hartfiel, JW: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a device that enables the user to re-program a flash EPROM that is functional but contains corrupted data. Flash EPROMs contain essential program information that, when corrupted, will not allow today's Personal Computers (PCs) to operate. The use of the Flash EPROM Over-rider provides a means of restoring functionality to a PC without an expensive repair of the system or system board.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 54% of the total text.

Flash EPROM Overrider

      Disclosed is a device that enables the user to re-program a
flash EPROM that is functional but contains corrupted data.  Flash
EPROMs contain essential program information that, when corrupted,
will not allow today's Personal Computers (PCs) to operate.  The use
of the Flash EPROM Over-rider provides a means of restoring
functionality to a PC without an expensive repair of the system or
system board.

      PC designs now commonly incorporate a flash EPROM that is
intended to be re-programmed when problems are found with the
information/programs that were originally placed in the EPROMs.  To
perform a re-program of the flash EPROM, the user must ensure that
the hardware is properly configured to support the re-programming,
run the appropriate Flash Update Utility program, and follow the
procedures correctly during the actual re-programming operation.
Violation of procedures or a problem/glitch in the re-programming
operation can result in incorrect information in the EPROM and, most
likely, a non-functional system.  Non-functional systems occur
because, in designs like most of them from IBM*, there is a single
flash EPROM with no back-up which would allow the system to function
on even a limited basis.  Without the Flash EPROM Over-rider, the
only options are to either replace the system board or to replace the
flash EPROM on the system board.

      The Flash EPROM Over-rider contains a socket that will clip
over the flash EPROM...