Browse Prior Art Database

Custom Device Installation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116741D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 105K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bo, W: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Disclosed is a scheme in which only the device packages required by the current configuration of the system are installed. This is essential if the system is to be scalable, and for the device packages to be shippable as separate licensed program products.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Custom Device Installation

      Disclosed is a scheme in which only the device packages
required by the current configuration of the system are installed.
This is essential if the system is to be scalable, and for the device
packages to be shippable as separate licensed program products.

      When an AIX* version 3 operating system is installed on an
RS/6000* workstation, the device drivers, configuration methods, and
corresponding Object Data Manager (ODM) database entries of almost
all devices supported by IBM* are installed.  As a result, several of
the drivers and configuration methods for devices that do not exist
in the current system configuration are also installed.  Not only are
they unnecessary, they also use a significant amount of disk space.
In addition, installing all device files increases the working set at
runtime and at installation time, as well as the time to install the
packages.  It also prohibits shipping separately installable device
packages outside an AIX release.  The scheme described in this
disclosure alleviates these problems.

      The invention disclosure can be described in three parts:  (i)
device package naming scheme, (ii) participating device configuration
methods, and (iii) the device configuration manager.
  (i) Device Packaging Scheme

      In AIX 4.1, the device drivers, configuration methods, ODM data
and other device related information for a given device are placed in
a device package.  All the device package names start with the
keyword "devices".  Further qualifiers are then used to differentiate
between the packages for different devices.  They are derived from a
combination of the device subclass and self-identifying detectable
sense code.  Further extensions can be added to the name for
different options such as .rte, .ucode, .diag, .X11 and .com
depending upon the software support the package contains.

      For example, the device package with options for an "8-bit
SCSI I/O Controller" with a sense code of 8d77, will be named
devices.mca.8d77.  The "mca" is for the Micro Channel* bus to which
the card would be attached.  The separate options to this package
would be devices.mca.8d77.com for the common code between this
adapter and other SCSI I/O controllers, devices.mca.8d77.rte for the
adapter specific drivers, configuration methods and ODM data, and
devices.mca.8d77.diag for the diagnostic code related to this device.

      After the device package names are generated, they are passed
to the install commands to perform the actual software installation.
Since the install commands allow for wild card matching on the
package names, the device package and its options will be installed
even if the package name without the .rte...