Browse Prior Art Database

Platen Mechanism for Passbook/Cutform Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116789D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hojo, T: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a platen mechanism for a passbook/cutform printer that is used by bank tellers. This mechanism enables the printer to print any size papers and passbooks that are folded horizontally or vertically.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 85% of the total text.

Platen Mechanism for Passbook/Cutform Printer

      Disclosed is a platen mechanism for a passbook/cutform printer
that is used by bank tellers.  This mechanism enables the printer to
print any size papers and passbooks that are folded horizontally or
vertically.

      The Figure shows this platen mechanism.  A print head travels
horizontally along by a guide shaft, but can not move vertically.  A
gap roller on the print head runs on a paper directly to keep a
certain distance between the paper and the print head.  This platen
is equipped with a parallel link mechanism.  Therefore, the platen
moves up and down, keeping its horizon posture without leaning.  A
tension spring, always pushing the platen up, is at the center of the
platen.  This mechanism does not require any power sources, such as
solenoids or motors.

      The platen's upward force is uniform at any point and this is
the cause of certain print quality.  For the vertically folded
passbooks which have two kinds of thickness on one line; as the
thickness changes, the gap roller pushes the platen down quickly.
Accordingly, the distance between a print head and paper is always
stable.  Therefore, it is possible to keep certain print quality, not
depending on the thickness of papers.  The spring can be weak enough
to lighten pressure marks made by a gap roller on carbon papers and
pressure sensitive papers, because the distance between the print
head and a paper changes quite little.  The pr...