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Browse Prior Art Database

Digital Still-Camera with Storage for Verbal Annotations

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116826D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 4 page(s) / 131K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bukszar, AE: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

When on vacation, camera users take many pictures. However, identifying those pictures is difficult much later on when the film is finally developed.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 40% of the total text.

Digital Still-Camera with Storage for Verbal Annotations

      When on vacation, camera users take many pictures.  However,
identifying those pictures is difficult much later on when the film
is finally developed.

      It is proposed that digital cameras have a small amount of
storage made available on the floppy disk of the camera for the
purpose of storing a brief verbal annotation.  The annotation would
be made immediately after the picture was taken.  The storage of the
annotation would be made serially on the disk, immediately following
the image.

      Via an appropriate Analog to Digital (A/D) converter, this
verbal annotation would be converted to a digital message which would
always accompany the image.  If desired, the stored acoustic signal
could then be played back via an inexpensive D/A converter in the
camera.  Current speech compression methods operating on speech
digitized at less than 10,000 samples/second are easily implemented
and provide for compact storage of acoustic annotation.  In addition,
this verbal annotation could later be converted to text on a PC, via
voice recognition software.

      This verbal annotation could later be converted to text on a
PC, via voice recognition software.

      This same idea could be used with film cameras.  The message
could be stored in analog or digital form via an LED, along the outer
edge of the film itself.  When the actual image is developed, the
annotation could be printed on the back of the picture (positive).
The annotation made on film could be converted to text via the same
method(s) used to convert the digital annotation stored on floppy or
optical disks, namely voice recognition software.

      If necessary, a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) could provide
digital text information, rather than verbal information.
Alternately, the scroll in which one writes information on the PDA
for storage would actually be embedded on the back of the camera.
Anything written on the scroll, be it on the PDA or on the camera
itself, regarding the picture just taken would be stored with that
picture.

The inventive claim is:
  o  An image and annotation pair.  This annotation may be verbal or
      text.
  o  A still camera with a microphone for the purpose of storing the
      verbal annotation with the image.  The camera would have a
"take
      voice" button in addition to a "take picture" button.
       The "take voice" button would become "armed" immediately
      after a picture was taken.  By pressing the "take voice"
button,
      a short message, say 10 seconds long, could be recorded.
      Successive pressing of the "take voice" button without taking a
      new picture would allow re-recording the message, for digital
      cameras but not film cameras.  Once a new picture was taken,
then
      a verbal recording could be made for that new picture and the
old
      verbal record...