Browse Prior Art Database

Head/Actuator Alignment and Stabilization

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116924D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 4 page(s) / 89K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Garcia, JL: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The crossbar is used to improve the natural frequency and the rigidity of the head actuator mount and to further ensure the stability of the head/actuator alignment under shipping and vibration conditions (Fig. 1).

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Head/Actuator Alignment and Stabilization

      The crossbar is used to improve the natural frequency and the
rigidity of the head actuator mount and to further ensure the
stability of the head/actuator alignment under shipping and vibration
conditions (Fig. 1).

      The crossbar is designed in such a way that it will not disturb
the alignment of the head accomplished by the pin/wedge clamp method
described above.  Such effect is accomplished as follows:
  o  The placement of the crossbar permits it to fully orient itself
      to exactly match the attitude of the top of the actuator base
by
      having 3 degrees of freedom (X Y Z) prior to being clamped
      solidly (Figs. 1 and 2).
  o  The Z degree of freedom is produced by the self controlled
      insertion of the pins at the end of the cross member into the
      block tieing it to the D bearings (Fig. 3).
  o  The X degree of freedom is provided by the looseness of the
holes
      used to tie the end blocks to the D bearings (Fig. 3).
  o  The Y degree of freedom is obtained by the slots in the center
      portion of the cross brace which are larger than the screws
that
      clamp it to the base top adapter (Fig. 3).
  o  This compliance to the base original position is obtained
without
      controlled adjustments but by following a sequence which
permits
      the parts to adapt themselves.

The assembly sequence of the crossbar, Fig. 3, is a...