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Chemical Halogenation of Carbon Overcoated Thin-Film Magnetic Storage Media in Solution

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116990D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Baum, TH: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Thin-film magnetic storage media typically utilize a hard carbon overcoat to enhance wear durability and to decrease corrosion of the magnetic media. The overcoat is usually lubricated with a fluorinated polyether lubricant or other suitable polymer. The lubricating polymer provides improved tribological properties and lubricity during head/disk operation in the file. However, the lubricating polymer is often not chemically bound to the disk/carbon surface and excessive spin-off of the lube can lead to degradation in the disks performance.

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Chemical Halogenation of Carbon Overcoated Thin-Film Magnetic Storage
Media in Solution

      Thin-film magnetic storage media typically utilize a hard
carbon overcoat to enhance wear durability and to decrease corrosion
of the magnetic media.  The overcoat is usually lubricated with a
fluorinated polyether lubricant or other suitable polymer.  The
lubricating polymer provides improved tribological properties and
lubricity during head/disk operation in the file.  However, the
lubricating polymer is often not chemically bound to the disk/carbon
surface and excessive spin-off of the lube can lead to degradation in
the disks performance.

      Chemical halogenation of the magnetic disk surface can be
achieved via standard solution chemical techniques.  For example,
immersion of the disk into a solution containing a halogenating
reagent results in the introduction of a halogen species (i.e., Cl,
Br, F, I) on the carbon overcoated surface of the disk.  The
introduction of halogen groups on the surface of the carbon
overcoated disk enables discrete chemical reactions which lead to
chemical bonding of species to the disk surface.  For example, the
chemical bonding of a lubricating perfluoroether polymer or a
non-conventional film with tribological properties can be achieved in
this manner.  Further, the reaction of an end-group with a chemically
halogenated carbon/disk surface results in strong chemical bonding to
the disk.

      The halogenation of sputtered...