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Browse Prior Art Database

Controlling Cable TV Systems within Certain Facilities

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117002D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 116K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cohen, PS: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a system including telephone handsets connected to a cable television system in a certain facility, such as a hotel or a hospital, so that users may retrieve data, images, movies, or sound clips on their room television sets, making selections through speech recognition. The system preferably includes a television speech server managing and synchronizing television screen prompts, acoustic messages, and feedback, with the speech recognition contexts in which choices can be made.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Controlling Cable TV Systems within Certain Facilities

      Disclosed is a system including telephone handsets connected to
a cable television system in a certain facility, such as a hotel or a
hospital, so that users may retrieve data, images, movies, or sound
clips on their room television sets, making selections through speech
recognition.  The system preferably includes a television speech
server managing and synchronizing television screen prompts, acoustic
messages, and feedback, with the speech recognition contexts in which
choices can be made.

      With either a hotel or a hospital application of the system,
the user can choose a movie to watch.  With a hotel application, the
user can, for example, also retrieve information on driving
instructions, local attractions, area restaurants, and other hotels
operated by the hotel chain.  He may be able to use the system to
shop directly from his room.  With a hospital application, the user
can also, for example, find information on food choices, specific
medical topics, and hospital fees.  He may also be able to use the
system to select or play computerized games.

      The Figure is a block diagram of the system, in which the voice
of the user is captured by a microphone, typically within a telephone
handset 1, as visual prompts are presented on the screen of a
television receiver 2.  The telephone handset 1 is connected to a
speech recognition system 3 through a telephone switch 4, such as a
Private Branch Exchange (PBX) or Computerized Branch Exchange (CBX),
routing calls throughout the facility of which room 5 is a part.  The
speech recognition system 3 controls a cable television system 6
providing television signals to the television receiver 2.  A cable
box 7 is optionally used to connect the receiver 2 to the cable
television system 6.  Speech recognition system 3 may be implemented
as a stand-alone system, or it may be imbedded into a device with
cable television system 6 or switch 4.

      The contexts, grammars, n-grams, and phonological models used
by speech recognition system 3 are a super-set of the on-screen
prompts and the most probable phrases that a user is likely to say,
given these prompts.  The system may also provide one or more
channels of audio through the telephone handset 1, through the
speaker of television 2, or through another speaker (not shown).  The
audio feedback be provided through multiple speaker systems may be
identical or different.  Optionally, a full duplex implementation of
the system allows the user to talk while listening, without having to
wait for the completion of an audio prompt.

      In a first implementation of the system, telephone is 1 used to
initiate a session.  The speech recognition system 3 is assigned a
telephone extension in switch 4, allowing additional callers to roll
over into different ports.  The user is prompted to call this
extension by means of audio and video prompts on television rec...