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Browse Prior Art Database

Virtual Console

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117011D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Borgendale, K: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is the use of a shared logical video buffer to provide a means for displaying console information for detached processes, which do not normally have a user interface, and for Graphical User Interface (GUI) processes. Normally, such processes provide very little output, only using console output to log events. In this way a virtual console is provided to perform various functions, such as error logging and simple operator interaction, normally provided by a console device in a large, traditional computing system.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Virtual Console

      Disclosed is the use of a shared logical video buffer to
provide a means for displaying console information for detached
processes, which do not normally have a user interface, and for
Graphical User Interface (GUI) processes.  Normally, such processes
provide very little output, only using console output to log events.
In this way a virtual console is provided to perform various
functions, such as error logging and simple operator interaction,
normally provided by a console device in a large, traditional
computing system.

      The logical video buffer of the virtual console is shared
between multiple sessions, with any session having a capability of
electing to send its text mode output to the virtual console.  If a
session is set up to make itself visible on the screen, the user can
view the console information, which can be output generated by the
current session or by another session attached to the virtual
console.

      Using the normal windowing system, the virtual console can be
displayed on a secondary display, full screen on the primary display,
or as a window on the primary display.  For example, during normal
operation of the system the virtual console may not be shown, while
during debugging or error tracing the virtual console is made
visible.