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Optical Disk Drive Loader for Work Station with Pluggable Magazine

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117028D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 4 page(s) / 120K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dimitri, KE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

An optical disk drive and loader can be housed inside a Work Station (or a PC) with plugable disks in a magazine outside the Workstation. The optical disk drive with the loader plugs into a full high 5 1/4 inch drive opening. A user can move the whole magazine or individual disks from one Work Station to another Work Station or to a shelf. This invention discloses a mechanism and an architecture for such a device.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Optical Disk Drive Loader for Work Station with Pluggable Magazine

      An optical disk drive and loader can be housed inside a Work
Station (or a PC) with plugable disks in a magazine outside the
Workstation.  The optical disk drive with the loader plugs into a
full high 5 1/4 inch drive opening.  A user can move the whole
magazine or individual disks from one Work Station to another Work
Station or to a shelf.  This invention discloses a mechanism and an
architecture for such a device.

      The device consists of (a) a half-high 5 1/4 inch optical disk
drive, (b) a loader mechanism that removes or inserts a disk from a
magazine and top loads it onto a half high drive (the loader occupies
the other half of the 5 1/4 inch slot), (c) a magazine which contains
several single sided disks and (d) loader I/F (Interface) logic that
is combined with the drive logic card.  The magazine can be much
larger if the drive and magazine loader are designed for a
stand-alone unit or if more space is available in the Workstation.

      Fig. 1 shows a workstation concept for the disk drive loader,
and Fig. 2 shows a stand-alone box concept.  The drive logic I/F card
shown in Fig. 3 has a microprocessor, memory, flash EPROM, RAM buffer
and SCSI I/F circuitry which are used by the drive loader, with
additional loader I/F logic, registers, and "X" and "Y" motor
drivers.  The SCSI command comes from the host and is interpreted by
the drive/loader I/F card as sub-commands to remove a disk if one is
mounted onto the drive, to load a disk onto the drive and to spin-up,
track and read or write a disk.

      The SCSI interface is used to address the drive and a disk in
the magazine is addressed using the LUN portion of the SCSI command
block coming from the device driver.  The drive and the magazine with
multiple disks look to the system user as one large disk with
multiple partitions.  This same concept with a larger magazine holder
can be adapted to a stand-alone drive/loader combination with
multiple SCSI addresses, each disk having its own SCSI address.  As
another option, a set of disks can have their own SCSI address and
each disk has its own LUN address.

      The I/F lines between the drive and the loader consist of the
"X" and "Y" motor driver signals and sense signals to monitor the
magazine and the loader status.  Other sense lines report status to
the logic card when a user removes a magazine or enters or changes a
disk in a magazine.

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