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Browse Prior Art Database

Wafer Design Techniques for Same-Gap-Servo Head

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117067D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kahwaty, VN: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed are design techniques that allow the placement of a servo read head into the same mechanical gap as data write heads for a magnetic tape head. The described designs sufficiently reduce the interference pick up by the servo channel while the data head is writing to allow an accurate servo error signal. The design include limitations on the choice of substrate material, layout/size of the element parts and cable configuration.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 60% of the total text.

Wafer Design Techniques for Same-Gap-Servo Head

      Disclosed are design techniques that allow the placement of a
servo read head into the same mechanical gap as data write heads for
a magnetic tape head.  The described designs sufficiently reduce the
interference pick up by the servo channel while the data head is
writing to allow an accurate servo error signal.  The design include
limitations on the choice of substrate material, layout/size of the
element parts and cable configuration.

      A multibump tape head consists of several arrays of heads
mounted opposite and parallel to each other in a single module as
depicted in Fig. 1.  Tape passes in a direction perpendicular to the
arrays.  A data track is recorded on tape or read by an individual
element of one of the arrays.  The precise positioning of the head
over the track is achieved by a feedback loop which uses a servo
element to detect track positioning error through a prerecorded servo
pattern.

      In prior art the servo and data elements are located on
different arrays to minimize crosstalk between the servo and the
writing data element.  Here design techniques are disclosed that
reduces crosstalk enough to allow for servo and data in the same gap.

      Conventional inductive-write/MR-read tape head arrays use
nonconductive magnetic substrates for the first shield/pole, large
coils for ease of fabrication, and read/write elements with leads and
cabling that bring read/servo and writ...