Browse Prior Art Database

Removable Media Storage Devices using Hard Disk Technology

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117077D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 86K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Billings, RA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a removable media storage device with hard disk-like performance at a competitive price per megabyte (MB).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Removable Media Storage Devices using Hard Disk Technology

      Disclosed is a removable media storage device with hard
disk-like performance at a competitive price per megabyte (MB).

      As hard disk drive technology continues to evolve and storage
densities approach 1 Gigabyte/in2, the performance mismatch between
the resident hard drive and the floppy disk backup has become
unacceptable.  Consider for example the 2.5" drive at 540 MB
capacity: 375 floppy diskettes will be required to back up this
drive.  Software packages and multimedia products have kept pace with
the growing drive capacities, now occupying 10s of MB of disk storage
and requiring 10-40 floppies to install.  Finally, graphics, desktop
publishing and computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing
(CAD/CAM) software routinely generate datasets in excess of the 1.44
MB floppy capacity limit.  The situation is particularly troublesome
for portable computer users, who often do not have access to high
performance tape or disk backup.

      Several technologies are vying for a place in the floppy drive
market.  Among the contenders are High Density Flexible Disk Drives
(HDFDDs), optical, flexible optical, and removable hard drives.  In
all cases, the technologies have failed to capture a significant
portion of the market for at least one of the following reasons: 1)
Price per MB is too high 2) Drive form factor is inconsistent with
space requirements for portable computers 3) Performance improvement
is insufficient to warrant the change 4) Lack of standardization of
media.

      The primary requirement in a removable storage device is that
the head/disk interface be tolerant to some level of environmental
contamination.  In magnetic technologies such as tape and floppy
drives, resilience is achieved by using contact recording on
deformable, compliant media.  Recently, a "near contact" interface
has been verified for hard disks also in which no wear occurs.  At
"near contact" spacings, true head/disk contact can be expected, but
on an intermittent basis; the ability of the interface to withstand
the contact can be attributed to several factors, including 1) the
us...