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Status Presentation in Object Oriented Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117084D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 90K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Colyer, AD: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

In object oriented systems management applications, there are various ways to represent the actual state and the intended state of a managed entity. One way is to define a definitional object to represent the intended state of a managed entity, and an image object to represent the actual state. Both the definitional object and the image object refer to the same managed entity. This is a powerful model as it allows the user to make a coherent set of changes to a definition before applying them, as a unit, to the running system.

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Status Presentation in Object Oriented Systems

      In object oriented systems management applications, there are
various ways to represent the actual state and the intended state of
a managed entity.  One way is to define a definitional object to
represent the intended state of a managed entity, and an image object
to represent the actual state.  Both the definitional object and the
image object refer to the same managed entity.  This is a powerful
model as it allows the user to make a coherent set of changes to a
definition before applying them, as a unit, to the running system.

      A problem arises when merging the definitional world image with
the image world, to present a simple unified picture to the user.

      The approach described here addresses this problem by using the
concept of a topology element.

      A topology element is an abstraction which represents one
managed entity and ties together the definitional object and the
image object which represent that managed entity.  It has one
important attribute, its color, which is explained below.  A topology
element is so named because it is contained in an object called a
topology, that is a group of managed entities, interrelated and
distributed about a network.  In particular, the active topology is
the current state of the managed world.

      Although it is stated above that a topology element ties
together a definitional and an image object, it is entirely possible
and supported by the model, that one or other is absent.  That is a
topology element can have only a definitional component or only an
image component.

This arises as follows:

      When a definition is first created, it does not yet reflect a
running instance of the managed entity (that doesn't yet exist).  So
the image object which represents the actual state of the entity is
missing.  The managed entity only exists in a definitional form.
Furthermore, a managed entity can exist in the real world which has
not been installed by the system management application, and for
which there is no definition.  These discovered managed entities can
still be represented by topology elements, which have no definitional
component.  The composition of a topology element (definition only,
image only or both definition and image) is represented by the color
attribute.

      Although the color of a topology element cou...