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Method to Enable the Inter-Client Communication Mechanism between Conference Enabled X Windows Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117091D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 6 page(s) / 217K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ansberry, CM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The problem of supporting the Inter-Client Communication Mechanism (ICCM) between conference enabled X Windows applications involves the merging of two concepts: the function of an X Windows Conferencing enabler and the details of the ICCM convention. In order to understand the problem of supporting ICCM between conferenced applications, background on each of these subjects will be provided, beginning with a few details on the X Windows Conferencing enabler.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 26% of the total text.

Method to Enable the Inter-Client Communication Mechanism between
Conference Enabled X Windows Applications

      The problem of supporting the Inter-Client Communication
Mechanism (ICCM) between conference enabled X Windows applications
involves the merging of two concepts:  the function of an X Windows
Conferencing enabler and the details of the ICCM convention.  In
order to understand the problem of supporting ICCM between
conferenced applications, background on each of these subjects will
be provided, beginning with a few details on the X Windows
Conferencing enabler.

      X Windows provides distributed client/server support for two
dimensional graphics applications.  The X server manages the display
on behalf of the application, enabling applications to open one or
more windows and then draw two dimensional graphics within the window
(Fig. 1).

      An X Window conferencing enabler inserts itself between an
application and an X server, appearing to the application to be an X
server, while at the same time appearing to the X server as an
application, as shown in Fig. 2.

      The X Windows conferencing enabler may then connect to multiple
X servers on behalf of the application, displaying the application's
windows on each display.  The application is not aware that it is
being distributed to multiple X servers.

      Separate from the capabilities of a conferencing enabler, one
of the features of X Windows is that several applications may use the
same X server, each asking the X server to create and manage
resources on its behalf.  In addition, the X server has resources of
its own, which are available for all applications using that X server
to share (Fig. 3).

      Since several applications may share the use of a single X
server, a convention has been created to enable X Windows
applications to communicate with each other.  This Inter-Client
Communication Mechanism (ICCM) defines a communication protocol
between two clients (otherwise referred to as applications), one of
which is the "owner" of the information and the other is the
"requestor".  ICCM enables the requestor to get information from the
owner in a form that the requestor requires.

      One common use of ICCM is to enable a user to cut from one
application and then paste that information to another application.
In this scenario, the owner is the application from which the
information was "cut", and the requestor is the application to which
it will be "pasted".

      In order to understand how the Inter-Client Communication
Mechanism is supported by an X Windows Conferencing enabler, first,
describe the ICCM protocol without the conferencing enabler (Fig. 4).
  1.  A user performs an action on client 1 that signals the
beginning
       of the process.  This could be a "cut".
  2.  Client 1 issues a set_selection_owner request, requesting to
       become the owner of a selection.
  3.  Since the set_selection...