Browse Prior Art Database

Disk Drive with Embedded Hyper-Text Markup Language Server

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117109D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ford, DA: AUTHOR

Abstract

The widespread availability of viewers known as "Web Browsers" for the standard Hyper-Text Markup Language (HTML) allows the creation of interactive user interfaces that are platform and system independent. This ability has spawned the explosive growth of the "World Wide Web", an eclectic assortment of interlinked user interfaces for various information sources spread around the world that are linked together via the communications facilities of the "Internet".

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Disk Drive with Embedded Hyper-Text Markup Language Server

      The widespread availability of viewers known as "Web Browsers"
for the standard Hyper-Text Markup Language (HTML) allows the
creation of interactive user interfaces that are platform and system
independent.  This ability has spawned the explosive growth of the
"World Wide Web", an eclectic assortment of interlinked user
interfaces
for various information sources spread around the world that are
linked
together via the communications facilities of the "Internet".

      This flexibility and standardization can be exploited to
provide user interfaces for information sources other than those
directly associated with the "Web" and the Internet.  For instance,
it is possible for various computer components, both hardware and
software, to generate HTML descriptions of their current
configurations or state.  These descriptions can be viewed using any
of the standard Web Browsers ("Web Explorer", "Mosaic", "NetScape",
etc.) without a need to connect to a network communications facility
(all browsers provide a mechanism to import HTML from files or
devices in a file system name space).  Thus, it is possible that
storage peripherals, magnetic disk drives, or RAID arrays, for
instance, could provide their own "web page" that a user of a
computer system could use to directly interact with the device.
Those interactions could involve, but are not limited to, retrieving
performance information, reconfiguration,...