Browse Prior Art Database

CICS* on the Internet

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117135D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Warren, P: AUTHOR

Abstract

There is a very rapid growth of interest in the Internet, currently believed to be accessible by some 35 million people. Providing a method for putting CICS servers on to the Internet permits all these people to use a Multi-media GUI front end (a Web browser) to fire off CICS* transactions which could be anything from data delivery to simple order processing. Such a process allows people to use CICS without having a CICS product installed on their machine.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 94% of the total text.

CICS* on the Internet

      There is a very rapid growth of interest in the Internet,
currently believed to be accessible by some 35 million people.
Providing a method for putting CICS servers on to the Internet
permits all these people to use a Multi-media GUI front end (a Web
browser) to fire off CICS* transactions which could be anything from
data delivery to simple order processing.  Such a process allows
people to use CICS without having a CICS product installed on their
machine.

      Internet users access other machines through a progam referred
to as the HTML Server, which runs a language called Hyper Text Markup
Language (HTML).  The system described here provides access to CICS
by interposing a small piece of 'glue' code between the HTML server
and the CICS client.

      The user runs a client program called a Web browser.  This
browser talks a protocol language called HTTP.  The HTML consists of
pages of information/pictures/audio/movie files.  An extension to
this language runs a program which performs the task of taking
information from one of these HTML pages and packaging it up into a
CICS External Call Interface (ECI) call.  This call is handled by the
CICS Common client in the same way as regular CICS application.  It
then performs the standard CICS flows to any CICS server.  The return
data is passed back through the Common Client to the 'glue' code,
where the data is processed into HTML language and delivered to the
HTML server so th...