Browse Prior Art Database

Electrostatic Discharge Protection Director to Device Connection Cables

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117149D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 82K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bonaccio, AR: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This invention relates generally to interfaces between units in a data processing system which are connected to one another by electrically conductive cables, and, more particularly, to protection of the circuitry used to drive and receive signals over such cables from damage due to electrostatic discharge.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Electrostatic Discharge Protection Director to Device Connection
Cables

      This invention relates generally to interfaces between units in
a data processing system which are connected to one another by
electrically conductive cables, and, more particularly, to protection
of the circuitry used to drive and receive signals over such cables
from damage due to electrostatic discharge.

      The present invention, as fully set forth below, describes an
apparatus for bleeding electrostatic charge which has accumulated on
a data transmission cable to ground, preventing said charge from
being dissipated through sensitive electronic components to which the
cable is to be connected.

      Referring to the Figure, it is assumed that there exists a
cable 3 containing a plurality of wires such as 4 and 5 which are to
be connected to a set of electronic drivers and receivers (not
shown).  This connection is achieved by mating serpentine connectors
1 and 2.  Connector 1 is physically attached to the end of the cable
3, while connector 2 is physically located inside of and mechanically
attached to the enclosure containing the driver, receiver, and
additional electronics.  The connectors contain pins such as pin 7
which connect wires such as wires 4 and 5 to points internal to the
enclosure.  The connector 1 also includes a screw 6 to insure good
and reliable electrical and mechanical connections.  Connector 2 also
includes a conductive bar 10 fashioned in such a way that a portion
of the bar extends into the hole which accepts screw 6.  At each end
of the bar are conductive springs 9 and 11 which are mechanically
connected to connector 2.  One or both of the springs 9 and 11 is
also connected to the electrical ground of the enclosure, which is
typically available inside of connector 2.

      The mechanical dimensions of connectors 1 and 2 and screw 6
are adjusted such that when connector 1 is mated...