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Chemical Vapor Deposition of Osmium from Bis(cyclopentadienyl) Osmium(II)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117154D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Reynolds, SK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for chemical vapor deposition of high purity osmium films using bis(cyclopentadienyl)osmium(II) (also called osmocene) as the precursor. The osmium films are afforded by thermal decomposition of the organometallic compound in an oxygen-containing carrier gas, by a pathway which involves complete pyrolysis of the organic ligands to give carbon dioxide and water as the only reaction byproducts. Pure osmium was deposited at substrate temperatures as low as 350ºC. The reaction is described by the balanced chemical equation below: 2(C(5)H(5)(2)Os + 25O(2) RARROW 2Os + (20CO(2) + 10H(2)O

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Chemical Vapor Deposition of Osmium from Bis(cyclopentadienyl) Osmium(II)

      Disclosed is a method for chemical vapor deposition of high
purity osmium films using bis(cyclopentadienyl)osmium(II) (also
called osmocene) as the precursor.  The osmium films are afforded by
thermal decomposition of the organometallic compound in an
oxygen-containing carrier gas, by a pathway which involves complete
pyrolysis of the organic ligands to give carbon dioxide and water as
the only reaction byproducts.  Pure osmium was deposited at substrate
temperatures as low as 350ºC.  The reaction is described by the
balanced chemical equation below:
  2(C(5)H(5)(2)Os + 25O(2) RARROW 2Os + (20CO(2) + 10H(2)O

      A simple bell jar apparatus (as shown in the Figure), employing
an electrically heated substrate chuck, and a method for controlling
carrier gas flows, suffices for efficient deposition of clean osmium
films.  The precursor compound (a powder) was placed in the bottom of
the bell jar, and the substrate was held a few inches above the
precursor.  Provsion was made to inject carrier gas at the bottom of
the bell jar, and the bell jar was evacuated with a rotary vane pump
through a port near the top.  Typical carrier gas flows were 50 sccm
of helium plus 20 sccm of oxygen, at total pressures (i.e., carrier
gases plus organometallic vapors) of 2-3 torr.  The precursor
compound was sublimed from the bottom of the bell jar by warming the
walls to 60-80 degrees C, by use of...