Browse Prior Art Database

User Interface Palette

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117159D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 4 page(s) / 108K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Scheiern, KL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a palette providing the user of a computer system with a selection of available functions, which may be performed during the operation of an application, together with various I/O (input/output) interface methods which may be enabled for use with each of these functions.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

User Interface Palette

      Disclosed is a palette providing the user of a computer system
with a selection of available functions, which may be performed
during the operation of an application, together with various I/O
(input/output) interface methods which may be enabled for use with
each of these functions.

      Fig. 1 is an example of a user interface table.  The operating
system stores one or more such tables, each of which indicates the
settings of a particular user interface scheme.  In this table, the
leftmost column contains a list of functions, each of which may be
displayed and controlled by one or more I/O methods.  The next column
indicates which of these functions are enabled.  The remaining
columns list, for each enabled function, the various I/O methods
which are used to display and control each of the functions.  The I/O
methods for functions which a re not enabled are marked "- NA -" for
"Not Available."  Also, if an interface method is not available in
the system, the corresponding column is disabled, so that the method
cannot by selected.  This type of limitation exists, for example, in
a system not having touch or speech capability.  In the example of
Fig. 1, few of the functions are visually enabled, creating a system
relying on speech as a primary interface.

      Fig. 2 is an example of a User Interface Palette, which lists a
number of interface schemes to be selected by the user.  Each of
these interface schemes is defined by a table, of the kind shown in
Fig. 1, stored within the system.  These schemes include a Default
interface scheme supplied, together with several other schemes, by
the operating system.  One of these other schemes, which employs
visual, audio, touch, and speech I/O methods, is identified with
"V/A/T/S."

      For e...