Browse Prior Art Database

Queueing of Multiple Commands to Multiple Interfaces within a Logic Chip

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117165D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Blackmon, HL: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method of designing a command controller that manages the receiving and executing of commands in a logic chip is disclosed. The main idea involves the use of a series of queues, containing pointers, that present multiple commands to multiple interfaces.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Queueing of Multiple Commands to Multiple Interfaces within a Logic
Chip

      A method of designing a command controller that manages the
receiving and executing of commands in a logic chip is disclosed.
The main idea involves the use of a series of queues, containing
pointers, that present multiple commands to multiple interfaces.

The invention is made up of five concepts:

      The first concept is to develop a First-In-First-Out (FIFO)
stack scheme to keep track of the order that commands are to be
presented or executed.

      The second concept is to develop a Key or ID that is assigned
to each command as it is received.  This Key or ID is moved through
the FIFO stack scheme instead of moving the command itself.  For
example, when a stack presents a command to an interface, it is
really using a Key, held in the stack, to point to the command that
is to be presented.

      The third concept is to separate the FIFO stack scheme into
multiple individual stacks.  There is one stack for each action on
each interface.  Some examples of actions might be: to receive a new
command, to present a command to an interface, or to wait until an
interface indicates it is finished executing a sub-function for the
command.

      The fourth concept is to design the depth of an individual
stack to be the same as the maximum number of commands that can be
held in the design at one time.

      The fifth concept is to design multiple sets of stacks, one set
f...