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Browse Prior Art Database

Battery Charger and Power Monitor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117195D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jones, JF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a power source for a network terminator, which is connected to a communications network, to an Integrated Service Digital Network (ISDN) adapter within a computing system, and to up to six conventional voice telephones.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 62% of the total text.

Battery Charger and Power Monitor

      Disclosed is a power source for a network terminator, which is
connected to a communications network, to an Integrated Service
Digital Network (ISDN) adapter within a computing system, and to up
to six conventional voice telephones.

      Within the network terminator, various voltages are generated
to operate the conventional voice telephones, as well as to operate
digital circuits.  Electrical power in the terminator comes from a
conventional AC power line through a 12-volt adapter, or, in the
event of a power failure, from a lead-acid battery, which can provide
power needed to operate the conventional voice telephones in an
extended power outage for 10 to 12 hours.  During operation of the
terminator from AC power, a trickle charge keeps the battery charged.

      The Figure is a schematic view of circuits associated with the
power supply and with battery charging.  Power comes from either the
AC adapter, through an adapter socket 1, or from the battery 2,
resulting in a bulk power voltage of about eight volts through the
terminal indicated as BULKPWR.  This voltage is reduced to a six-volt
reference voltage within a voltage regulator 3.  The bulk power
voltage is also changed by other circuits (not shown) within the
network terminator to provide, for example, tip and ring currents for
the conventional telephones.  If the voltage input to voltage
regulator 3 is insufficient, the ERROR signal is provided as an
ou...