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Proofreading Aid for Speech Dictation Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117204D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Eastwood, PR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Described is the use, in a dictation system using speech recognition, of certainty measurements calculated by the dictation system to identify the words for which the speech recognition system is relatively uncertain that the match of its output to the spoken input is correct.

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Proofreading Aid for Speech Dictation Systems

      Described is the use, in a dictation system using speech
recognition, of certainty measurements calculated by the dictation
system to identify the words for which the speech recognition system
is relatively uncertain that the match of its output to the spoken
input is correct.

      In a conventional word processing system with keyboard input,
the proofreading process is facilitated through the use of a spell
checking routine, which compares each word in a document being
checked with the entries in a dictionary table.  If a word in the
document cannot be found in the dictionary, it is displayed for the
user as highlighted, along with alternative choices when possible.

      On the other hand, a dictation system using speech recognition
receives, as input, a spoken word or phrase, and uses sophisticated
analytical methods to match the spoken input with elements stored
within a dictionary of words and/or phrases.  The system then puts
the best match to the spoken input into the document being generated.
Most dictation systems also provide, in order of best fit, a number
of other words or phrases matching the spoken input without matching
it as well as the word or phrase that has been chosen.  Because the
words provided as output have all been taken from the dictionary,
they are all correctly spelled, whether or not they match the spoken
input.  Therefore, a conventional spell checking routine is of no
assis...