Browse Prior Art Database

Music Delivery Network

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117218D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 4 page(s) / 148K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cook, RL: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Disclosed is an electronic delivery network for reproducing recorded music from pre-recorded music data. The music data is delivered on demand, in real time, over communication lines from a central site.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 43% of the total text.

Music Delivery Network

      Disclosed is an electronic delivery network for reproducing
recorded music from pre-recorded music data.  The music data is
delivered on demand, in real time, over communication lines from a
central site.

      The Figure is a block diagram of this delivery network, which
provides music to be played over a number of end user devices, such
as jukebox terminals, producing musical recording on request by
customers, generally in return for monetary payment, and home
players, producing music on demand in the home market.

      A jukebox terminal provides the functions of the familiar,
coin-operated, commercial music playing device, storing a local list
of available songs, providing a means of collecting payment for
playing a song, and maintaining a local queue of songs to be played.
Along with coins, payment may be made through the use of currency,
credit cards, debit cards, and smart cards.  When a user requests a
song, the jukebox terminal sends a message requesting the song to the
central site and informs the central site of any money collected.
The terminal then receives recorded song data from the central site,
if necessary decompresses the data in real time and plays the
material represented by the data.

      In addition to playing music, the jukebox terminal provides a
number of services unique to the installation of a particular client.
For example, a restaurant may provide menus through the terminal, or
various establishments may provide navigation services with bitmaps,
advertising, printed tickets, coupons, and various promotional items.

      The jukebox terminal can operate as a stand-alone device when
it is not being asked to play music, having local memory for storing
video advertisements.  The list of available songs is also held in
local memory, and money can be collected without interaction with the
central site.  While there is no local storage of customer-selectable
music, an option is provided for local storage of music data to play
in the event of failure of the communications link with the central
site.  Communications from the central site, over the communications
line otherwise used to transmit music data, are used to update
information stored in the terminal, such as local store
advertisements and sequences used to attract customers to the
terminal.  Such communications have a lower priority than music data
transmissions.

      The jukebox terminal is also used in a Disk Jockey (DJ) mode,
with a single individual controlling the play of music, as the
financial payment mechanisms otherwise used through the terminal are
disabled.  Either a running total of costs is maintained at the
central site, or a flat fee is charged for an engagement.  Otherwise,
the system functions for providing music as described above, except
that the DJ operator is given capabilities to maintain a local queue
of songs to be played and to manipulate this queue by adding or
deleting...