Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Object Oriented Analysis

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117249D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 4 page(s) / 126K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Anchell, E: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method with which an information developer, or domain expert user, generates keywords (subjects) and phrases (tasks) which pool to characterize and describe a domain. This method creates an Object Oriented Analysis (OOA), mapping information structures to form Object Oriented Information (OOI). The OOA for a domain is derived by a program that interviews the user in a conversational manner, allowing an individual not familiar with OOA techniques to execute an object-oriented analysis and design.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 45% of the total text.

Method for Object Oriented Analysis

      Disclosed is a method with which an information developer, or
domain expert user, generates keywords (subjects) and phrases (tasks)
which pool to characterize and describe a domain.  This method
creates an Object Oriented Analysis (OOA), mapping information
structures to form Object Oriented Information (OOI).  The OOA for a
domain is derived by a program that interviews the user in a
conversational manner, allowing an individual not familiar with OOA
techniques to execute an object-oriented analysis and design.

      With this method, the classes that make up a domain in question
are derived initially or during the process of the domain analysis.
Preferably, an initial set of topics (classes, subjects, tasks) is
derived before the user begins the analysis.  The topic list can be
determined, for example, through the efforts of someone who has some
experience with OOA, by observing objects on a graphical design
specification and by entering the names of the objects as topics
(icons on a screen), or by using a parsing tool.  An algorithm within
the parsing tool takes existing documentation to derive a potential
topic list which can then be modified by the user.  The presently
described method supports any of these techniques for determining a
topic list, while allowing a user to supply new topics at any point
in the OOA process.

      The initial documentation generally needed for a project may be
used directly in this process.  Most documentation tools, or word
processing programs, provide for the generation of a table of
contents or an index, which can be run through a parser looking for
nouns.  In the parser, nouns following one another in a string are
considered to be a single topic, while nouns separated in a string by
words which are not nouns are considered to be separate topics.  For
example, "menu popups" remains intact as a single topic, while
"pointers and cursors" becomes two separate topics.  The parser
displays its results in a list with which the user interacts, adding,
removing, and modifying elements.

      From this point, the user begins a program executing according
to the presently disclosed method.  He is prompted to enter topics,
or to select topics from a list which has been generated as described
above.  Based on previous iterations, an algorithm determines a
super-topic or "container" for each topic.  The program prompts the
user to enter other topics in which a current topic may be contained,
presenting possible containers in a list that mirrors the topic list.
If an item for which the user is searching to form the container is
not in this list, the user can enter a new item, to be considered as
a new topic by the algorithm, which adds the new item to each of the
lists being considered.

      The user is then prompted to select other topics which are
contained in the current topic.  Again a list of topics mirroring the
topic list is presen...