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Eliminating Ambiguity between Voice Commands and Other Input

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117253D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Smith, D: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is the identification of voice commands to a computing system, having a capability to operate on such commands, through the selection of a command-identifying area on the screen of the system. When an application can use voice input through a microphone both for commands to the system and for another purpose, such as teleconferencing, this area must be selected before a voice command is given. This area of the screen may be identified, for example, by an icon showing a talking head, which is selected using a pointing device, such as a mouse or stylus (pen), or by touching the screen of a touch-sensitive display.

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Eliminating Ambiguity between Voice Commands and Other Input

      Disclosed is the identification of voice commands to a
computing system, having a capability to operate on such commands,
through the selection of a command-identifying area on the screen of
the system.  When an application can use voice input through a
microphone both for commands to the system and for another purpose,
such as teleconferencing, this area must be selected before a voice
command is given.  This area of the screen may be identified, for
example, by an icon showing a talking head, which is selected using a
pointing device, such as a mouse or stylus (pen), or by touching the
screen of a touch-sensitive display.

      For example, when the user selects this area during a
teleconferencing session, the telephone call being made though the
system microphone is muted, as the voice input is directed to a
speech recognition subsystem.  The computer system continues taking
voice commands until the user releases the device used to select the
command-identifying area of the display screen.  When this device is
released, teleconferencing resumes, unless a command has been given
to terminate the teleconferencing session.

      This method has the advantage of eliminating the ambiguity
present in other methods, such as the use of a word or phrase to
identify a following command.  This ambiguity results from the
possible use of the same word or phrase in normal conversation.