Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Enhanced Mouse to Detect Rotation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117281D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 106K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lynne, KJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is an enhancement to the design of a traditional single-ball mouse that greatly increases its usefulness in modern "point-of-view" applications by allowing the mouse to detect and report rotation information in addition to the traditional planar motion.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Enhanced Mouse to Detect Rotation

      Disclosed is an enhancement to the design of a traditional
single-ball mouse that greatly increases its usefulness in modern
"point-of-view" applications by allowing the mouse to detect and
report rotation information in addition to the traditional planar
motion.

      A traditional mouse is augmented with a secondary "sensing
mechanism" mounted either behind, in front or to the side of the
primary "sensing mechanism."  As shown in the Figure (and in the
majority of mice), the "sensing mechanism" is shown as a round ball
mounted in an apparatus that senses when the ball is rotating and in
which direction.  However, this disclosure does not depend on any
particular sensing mechanism; only that the sensing mechanism,
whatever it is, can detect and report the real time x-y displacement
of the mechanism relative to the surface with which it is in contact.
However, for naming convenience this "sensing mechanism" is simply
referred to as a "ball" throughout this disclosure.  The second
"ball" is functionally identical to the primary ball in that it also
is able to detect relative x-y motion across the contact surface.  As
long as the the mouse body is not rotated while being moved, both
balls sense and report exactly the same x-y motion.  However, if the
mouse body is rotated, the two balls report different x-y motions and
the difference of these motions can be used by software to determine
the amount and speed of rotation.

      The algorithm for determining the amount of rotation will
depend on the physical orientation of the balls on the mice and their
distance from each other.  Any rotation shows up as a difference
between the motion seen by the two balls in the direction
perpendicular to the axis on which the balls are aligned.  If the
balls are mounted one behind the other (aligned on the y axis), as
shown in the Figure, then the rotation can be determined by the
di...