Browse Prior Art Database

Use of Callback Routines in the Implementation of Open Systems Interconnection Management Standards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117282D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 8 page(s) / 259K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Nielsen, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

The basic concept is the use of callbacks (or inline exits) in the implementation of OSI-managed objects. This solves the problem of how to incorporate implementation-specific details into otherwise standardized and thus predefined definitions, here the definitions provided for OSI management. Usually, the standards related to OSI management describe the syntax and contents of the "database" that exists at an OSI agent. They also describe, in English or another natural language, some semantics saying how the objects in the database should behave. The user needs to implement this description and "tie" the database to existing, real-world products.

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Use of Callback Routines in the Implementation of Open Systems Interconnection
Management Standards

      The basic concept is the use of callbacks (or inline exits) in
the implementation of OSI-managed objects.  This solves the problem
of how to incorporate implementation-specific details into otherwise
standardized and thus predefined definitions, here the definitions
provided for OSI management.  Usually, the standards related to OSI
management describe the syntax and contents of the "database" that
exists at an OSI agent.  They also describe, in English or another
natural language, some semantics saying how the objects in the
database should behave.  The user needs to implement this description
and "tie" the database to existing, real-world products.

      Generally speaking, the concept is how to merge
implementation-specific portions of code (the callbacks) into a
structure that is dictated by a standardized definition.

      The underlying objective is to enable an easy, user-friendly
generation of complete executing agents in an OSI environment.  Since
the standardized OSI definitions are (intentionally and necessarily)
incomplete, the missing elements or parts would normally have to be
hand-coded.  The proposed concept uses callbacks instead, thus
automating much of the code generation process and providing a
structured framework for the remaining hand-coding to be done.  All
of the code necessary to implement the standardized portions of an
agent is automatically generated; when implementation-specific or
semantic decisions need to be made, a predefined set of code
fragments is called to decide what to do next.

      Such callbacks can be used in the implementation of behavior,
the interaction with an underlying resource, or the addition of a
specific capability to an otherwise standardized implementation.  As
an example, if a specific request modifies a data value, behavior can
be associated with the operation that restrict permissible values to
a given range.  Now, a callback is defined that checks for
acceptability of proposed values.  As another example, when the value
of an attribute is changed, this sometimes requires the change in the
value of the underlying resource.  This can either be accomplished by
additional coding in an existing callback or by designing a specific
callback for this resource.

      A callback may be included in the delivered source code, in
which case the user has direct access, or it may be maintained as a
separate routine, e.g., in a table that is called from a central
program.

Implementations of Invention

      Suppose a simple object class definition exists that represents
a person and consists of three attributes (the person's name, phone
number, and a flag that represents whether the person is an employee
of the company) and also contains an ACTION that saves the current
values of the attributes to permanent storage.

      This class definition should...