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Using a Semantic Network to Describe Transaction Objects

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117289D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 107K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Colyer, AM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

An application manager for managing applications such as CICS/6000 is required to track the resources of such applications, e.g., files, programs, etc. Thus, a CICS system can contain files, programs and transactions. Each of these have attributes and actions which can be performed upon them. The attribute values are not in general stored within the application manager, but within a definition database owned by the application, e.g., a CICS/6000 stanza file. Thus, the action of getting or setting an attribute in general becomes an invocation of a 'cicsget' or similar command. It would be possible to define SOM objects which represent each resource to be thus managed and then write lines of code which issue the necessary commands to get and set each attribute.

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Using a Semantic Network to Describe Transaction Objects

      An application manager for managing applications such as
CICS/6000 is required to track the resources of such applications,
e.g., files, programs, etc.  Thus, a CICS system can contain files,
programs and transactions.  Each of these have attributes and actions
which can be performed upon them.  The attribute values are not in
general stored within the application manager, but within a
definition database owned by the application, e.g., a CICS/6000
stanza file.  Thus, the action of getting or setting an attribute in
general becomes an invocation of a 'cicsget' or similar command.  It
would be possible to define SOM objects which represent each resource
to be thus managed and then write lines of code which issue the
necessary commands to get and set each attribute.  The same technique
could be applied for implementing actions which again in general
result in the issuing of a system command.  Finally, for each such
object, a way could be found of storing the relationships from it.
There will be one to a container, e.g., a file is contained in a
system.  There may be many others, e.g., a transaction relates to a
first program, a CICS system relates to a DCE cell.  Implementing
objects this way would be very complex and experience shows that it
is very error prone.  The approach described here provides a way to
represent metadata which defines the behavior and inter-relationships
of classes of objects by using a semantic network to represent the
classes.  Individual attributes are described by name and type and in
addition an arbitrary set of extra data (e.g., a prototype command
string) can be defined or use by some very generic code which will
get and set the attribute.  The semantic network is persistent and
thus avoids the need to read 'flat' data (e.g., the SOM IR) and
deduce some structure from it.  The result is good performance and
the ability to alter the class definitions at will.

      Within the application manager the objects to be managed are
implemented as SOM objects which point at subjects within a pair of
semantic networks.  The 'left-hand' subject describes the instance
data and the 'right-hand' subject describes the Class data.  Thus, by
navigating in the RH net the attributes and actions which are
possible on the subject in the LH net (and thus by implication on the
SOM object) can be deduced.  In addition, arbitrary data can be
attached to the attribute or action descriptors, e.g., the prototype
command use to implement the action.  Moreover, objects in the RH net
can be interrelated to indicate that instance objects of a particular
class may (or must...