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Browse Prior Art Database

Implementation of Image Annotation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117309D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 211K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Williams, DW: AUTHOR

Abstract

A program is disclosed for annotating images by marking regions of interest and associating the marks with editable labels. By clicking mouse buttons the marks and associated labels are created, moved, edited and deleted.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Implementation of Image Annotation

      A program is disclosed for annotating images by marking regions
of interest and associating the marks with editable labels.  By
clicking mouse buttons the marks and associated labels are created,
moved, edited and deleted.

      Many applications require that an image be displayed and
annotated to indicate areas of interest within the image.  For
example, fingerprint matching systems require that features like
ridge-endings and ridge-bifurcations are marked and numbered so that
corresponding features can be shown in matching prints.  It is
crucial that the labels do not obscure important areas of the image.

      This disclosure describes a method in which markers and
associated labels are created without obscuring the image.  This is
achieved by placing the labels to the left or right of the image
area, and drawing lines between markers and associated labels.  Once
created the labels can be moved up and down in the label area, to
obtain the best arrangement without obscuring the image.

The procedure for annotating the image is as follows:

      During the annotation process a marker can be placed on the
image by pressing the middle or right mouse button (depending on the
type of marker; a circle or a square) while the mouse pointer is over
the particular image area.  This creates a marker (circle or square)
that overlays the image, and while the mouse button is still pressed
a line joining the marker to the mouse pointer is drawn.  This line
is constantly updated as the mouse pointer is moved around the
screen.

      When the mouse button is released over an area (label area)
either side of the image a label appears at the location of the mouse
pointer, and a line joining the label to the marker is drawn; these
features are illustrated in the Figure.  The label is automatically
numbered so the marker can be referred to by it's number.  The label
can be allocated a different number by typing in a box (labelled
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