Browse Prior Art Database

Analog Interactive Television System with Two Service Levels

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117365D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 6 page(s) / 258K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Scott, RK: AUTHOR

Abstract

This disclosure makes the assumption that for the near future, analog TV systems will be a viable, cost-effective implementation for interactive TV (1). It asserts that a typical analog cable television system with its implementation of interactive services could be divided into two service levels. Each would present a different cost to the cable operator. A model is proposed that will aid in the design of such a network based on predicted user demand. The model is extended to offer guidance for when such a two-tiered network should be implemented based on the relative costs of the tiers.

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Analog Interactive Television System with Two Service Levels

      This disclosure makes the assumption that for the near future,
analog TV systems will be a viable, cost-effective implementation for
interactive TV (1).  It asserts that a typical analog cable
television system with its implementation of interactive services
could be divided  into two service levels.  Each would present a
different cost to the cable operator.  A model is proposed that will
aid in the design of such  a network based on predicted user demand.
The model is extended to offer  guidance for when such a two-tiered
network should be implemented based  on the relative costs of the
tiers.

      An interactive TV (ITV) system can be thought as having three
separate components.  One part is the Server Complex that contains
the stored files that will be used for the interactive sessions.  A
server may contain multimedia files, executable programs, or other
information.  At the other end of this generalized model is the user
with its access to the system.  The user receives information from
the system with a standard TV set, an intervening set-top box, or a
Personal Computer (PC).  The Network sits between the server complex
and the user.  This model assumes an intelligent network capable of
performing the following functions:
  Access     The network provides user access to data stored in the
              server complex.  Also, the network provides the
              maintenance path by which data stored in the complex is
              added, modified, or deleted.  Users may also be given
              access to one another through the network, allowing
users
              in different locations to join in interactive games or
              other activities.  Finally, users can be granted access
              through the network to other information sources such
as
              broadcast TV, local programming, information providers,
              advertisers, the Internet, etc.
  Control    The network provides mechanisms to establish and delete
              connections between a user and the server complex,
              numerous information sources, or other users.  Users
can
              be denied specific connections or granted limited
              privileges based on stored profiles.  The network can
also
              monitor the number and duration of connections for
billing
              purposes.
  Transport  The network also provides the physical conveyance of
              information from the various sources to the user, and
from
              the user back to the information source.  The network
has
              the responsibility of transforming information as
required
        ...