Browse Prior Art Database

Historical View of Window-History

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117384D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 90K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gregg, LE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for maintaining a time-sensitive display of a window environment. Once this time-sensitive information exists, it can be used to observe window activity or return the window environment to a previous state.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Historical View of Window-History

      Disclosed is a method for maintaining a time-sensitive display
of a window environment.  Once this time-sensitive information
exists, it can be used to observe window activity or return the
window environment to a previous state.

      In any computer which displays multiple "windows", the window
manager currently maintains information about all windows including
the obvious parameters such as name and location.  The technique
described here simply describes additional techniques to manage or
display the existing window information.

      In addition to the window data normally maintained, an
historical view or time-sensitive view of the window data is saved.
When the time-sensitive data was created the user would have several
options for the data it would record and display.  Both the number of
"snapshots" preserved, and their selection could be controlled.  This
historical data would be displayed within another window.

      In the simplest case, one snapshot would be preserved and the
user would manually indicate when he wanted a snapshot of his current
windows preserved.  (Any previously existing snapshot would be
discarded when a new one was made.)  At any subsequent time
"selecting" the display in the time sensitive display would return
all windows to their sizes and positions at the time of the snapshot.
(Of course, any deleted windows would not appear and windows created
since the snapshot was preserved could default to the front or back
of the window display or they could even be closed and deleted.)
This feature could be useful to occasionally preserve a window
environment which the user was generally pleased with.  If things
later got cluttered or confused this provides an easy way to return
to a "known" state.

      In a more complex case the time-sensitive display would be
able to record some (finite) series of snapshots.  In this case if
additional snapshots were requested they would overly the oldest
existing snaphot.  When displayed the normal "scroll bar" functions
would be used to move between the available snapshots.

      With multiple snapshots being recorded these snapshots could
be initiated manually, or automatically in one of several schemes.
In "automatic" mode an intuitive scheme might be to record the window
state each time it changes.  This would provide a way to "back up"
for the number of changes which are recorded.  This provides a way to
recover from those situations where you select a window to hide or
display and immediate...