Browse Prior Art Database

Configurable Desktop Power Sequencing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117430D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Appel, WD: AUTHOR [+7]

Abstract

This paper describes a user-configurable method for controlling the power sequencing of a power managed desktop computer. The user can set a jumper in the system to determine whether the system should power up immediately upon application of AC power or wait for the user to push the system power button.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Configurable Desktop Power Sequencing

      This paper describes a user-configurable method for controlling
the power sequencing of a power managed desktop computer.  The user
can set a jumper in the system to determine whether the system should
power up immediately upon application of AC power or wait for the
user to push the system power button.

      With the PC industry moving towards Energy Star compliance,
there comes the additional requirement for more complex control over
the power sequencing of the computer.  Generally, some piece of
circuitry in the system is powered up and reset as soon as AC power
is applied to the machine; then this circuitry (called Power
Management (PM) control) is responsible for powering up the rest of
the system at the user's request, usually by pushing a momentary
switch (referred to as the system power button).  This design
replaces the traditional method of having an open/close power switch,
connected right to the power supply, which directly controls turning
off/on the system.  The problem with this new design occurs when the
user prefers to use an AC power strip to control turning on and off
his machine instead of using the system power button.  The PM
circuitry has no method to detect whether the user just supplied AC
power by plugging in the power cord (in which case, the user would
then push the button to turn the system on) or by turning on the
power strip (in which case, the user would want the rest of the
system to then be automatically turned on).  In either case, AC...