Browse Prior Art Database

Suitcase Icon User Interface (Suitcasing)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117537D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 181K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Henshaw, SF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method is disclosed for showing contained objects for a specific container in a transitory window.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 63% of the total text.

Suitcase Icon User Interface (Suitcasing)

      A method is disclosed for showing contained objects for a
specific container in a transitory window.

      Icons are presented at the bottom of a user's screen.  The last
four icons are used to create prompt windows.  Access to these icons
is common but at the cost of real estate.  A user has four icons so
that they can easily access the window associated with a given task,
without having to figure out which prompt window is in the indirect
window list, as well as being able to have four concurrent occurring
at one time.  The user can decide to "suitcase" the icons by
selecting them and bringing up the OS/2* desktop context menu which
provides a suitcase option.  The result is shown in diagram 2 -- a
new icon which the user has called "suitcase".  This icon behaves
much differently than a simple folder icon.  As soon as the user's
pointer enters the suitcase icon's space (diagram 3), a pullright
"menu" or "windowspace" is presented into which the user can move the
pointer.  As long as the mouse pointer remains in that "window space"
or "menu" area, the user can operate on the contained (or
"suitcased") objects as if they were directly on the desktop.  A user
can double click to open or resurface an existing instance of an
object, or the user can pick up the object to perform some action on
it through drag and drop (for example, to print it), or to move the
object to a different location.  With one movement o...