Browse Prior Art Database

Integrated Circuit for Li-Ion System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117554D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Odaohara, S: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a Li-Ion powered system which supports two batteries at the same time. Usually, a Li-Ion battery has a circuit for detecting an abnormal condition so that it can control protection switches to stop charging or discharging when some abnormal condition, such as over-current charging, is detected. The system also has means for communicating with the circuit within the battery and protocol for controlling these protection switches. Active battery will be changed between main and secondary batteries by controlling these switches from the system. Thus, the battery control circuit inside the system can be replaced with the protection switches inside battery.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 97% of the total text.

Integrated Circuit for Li-Ion System

      Disclosed is a Li-Ion powered system which supports two
batteries at the same time.  Usually, a Li-Ion battery has a circuit
for detecting an abnormal condition so that it can control protection
switches to stop charging or discharging when some abnormal
condition, such as over-current charging, is detected.  The system
also has means for communicating with the circuit within the battery
and protocol for controlling these protection switches.  Active
battery will be changed between main and secondary batteries by
controlling these switches from the system.  Thus, the battery
control circuit inside the system can be replaced with the protection
switches inside battery.

      The Figure shows an example implementing the present invention.
When the system wants to change the active battery, it sends a
command to both batteries for controlling the switches inside the
battery.  Each battery receives the command and controls the switches
as the system gives orders, if there is no abnormal condition.  If
the detection circuit finds an abnormal condition, it ignores the
system command in order to protect the battery, and the battery sends
this information to the system so that the system can take an
appropriate action.

      The number of batteries supported is not limited to two, but
more than two batteries could be controlled using this method.  Also,
battery technology is not limited to Li-Ion; consequently, it's
av...