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Adapting Air-Cooled Computer Elements to Fluid Cooling

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117558D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 4 page(s) / 95K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Buller, L: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Semiconductor and computer companies are designing chips which can dissipate more than 50 watts each and grouping them together on planars and multichip modules to form advanced computers and workstations.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Adapting Air-Cooled Computer Elements to Fluid Cooling

      Semiconductor and computer companies are designing chips which
can dissipate more than 50 watts each and grouping them together on
planars and multichip modules to form advanced computers and
workstations.

      Present system designs are a necessary compromise between
electrical and thermal performance and mechanical design.
Frequently, electrical performance including planar and/or module
size and shape dictates a less than optimal component placement for
thermal design.

      Thermal limitations also impose power and performance limits on
individual modules and groups of modules.  For instance, a chip may
not be able to be operated at it's maximum speed because this would
generate more heat than can be dissipated with fan-forced air
cooling.  The size, power consumption and noise generated by fans and
ducting are also becoming a factor in system design.

      In addition, there are concerns with the impact on reliability
when circuits rapidly go from a relatively cool inactive state to a
relatively hot active state.  This transition can take place in a
very short time and cause mechanical stresses on the chips, the chip
to module joints, module to carrier joints, etc.

      This disclosure presents a simple method of adapting present
air cooled systems or subsystems to fluid cooling.  It will attach
easily to existing hardware.  No mechanical modifications to
heatsinks or the planar assembly process is required.

      Figs. 1 to 3 demonstrate one embodiment of the disclosure, in
which a manifold has been fitted between the fins of an existing heat
sink.  The manifold has entry and exit ports which allow fluid to be
passed through it.  The manifold fits so as to provide a low thermal
resistance path from the heatsink and it's associated module to the
manifold, and then to the fluid inside the manifold.

      Fig. 1 shows a simple depiction of a heatsink with four fins.
Fig. 2 shows a manifold with three branches w...