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Hardware Strategy for Distributed Computing Environment Testing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117559D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 4 page(s) / 128K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Abbattista, A: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

To manage the complexity of the DCE test environment and resource constraints, the DCE test team defined a hardware strategy defining the network topology, physical machine arrangement, and machine utilization.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Hardware Strategy for Distributed Computing Environment Testing

      To manage the complexity of the DCE test environment and
resource constraints, the DCE test team defined a hardware strategy
defining the network topology, physical machine arrangement, and
machine utilization.

      The problem involved the lack of a detailed hardware strategy
for adequately performing a Product Assessment (PA) test on the
Distributed Computing Environment (DCE) to insure quality released
products.  PA testing, a post Functional Verification Test (FVT),
consists of scenarios focusing on product functionality, stability,
reliability, stress, and interoperability (software and hardware)
using large system configurations representative of customer
environments.  The Distributed Computing Environment provides
services which allows a distributed application to interact with
multiple types of computers, operating systems, and networks as if
they were a single system.

      The solution involved architecting a hardware utilization
plan used to identify defects in the DCE product that may impact a
customer's business operations.  The team developed a hardware
strategy that supported a test strategy which gradually built and
enlarged the DCE cell configurations over time while increasing the
complexity of the test cases.  The hardware strategy determined the
network topology, physical machine arrangement, and machine
utilization.

      The hardware strategy provided for different DCE cell
configurations, starting with three machine cells and moving up to
twenty six machine cells (constrained by hardware limitations).  The
DCE cell configurations included non-distributed servers, distributed
servers, replicated servers, intercell access using DNS and X500, and
single and multiple LANS.  Additionally, the machines in the DCE
cells communicated using different protocols, Token Ring, Ethernet,
FDDI, X.25, SLIP, therefore verifying DCE's functionality using these
communication media's as well as the routers and gateways connecting
the network.  The strategy efficiently supported all the various DCE
cell configurations using the five different communication protocols,
a variety of different size RISC/6000 machines with a variety of
available DASD and memory.

      Again, the strategy specified the network topology, physical
machine arrangement, and machines for each DCE cell.  The test bed
included RISC boxes ranging from Model 220 to Model 580.  The RISC
boxes contained from 30 MB to 128 MB of memory and had available from
1400 MB to 5 GB of DASD.  The ten DCE and DFS testers used the
machines simultaneously having up to 7 DCE cells configured at one
time.

      First, the team designed a network topolog...