Browse Prior Art Database

Bit Pattern Voice Recognition Controller

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117567D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 4 page(s) / 173K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hershey, PC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes methods for the detection of voice commands using the Event Driven Interface (EDI) invention described in (*). Voice commands spoken by specific individuals have unique voice signatures that can be digitized into recognizable bit patterns based on pitch, amplitude, and phase. These digital signals can then be transmitted and sent to circuitry designed to carry out these commands through the use of microprocessors and electro-mechanical devices. This invention describes the use of the EDI; along with voice digitizing circuitry, a microprocessor and electro-mechanical devices; to recognize voice commands from specific individuals and to carry out both simple and complex tasks called for by theses commands.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Bit Pattern Voice Recognition Controller

      This article describes methods for the detection of voice
commands using the Event Driven Interface (EDI) invention described
in (*).  Voice commands spoken by specific individuals have unique
voice signatures that can be digitized into recognizable bit patterns
based on pitch, amplitude, and phase.  These digital signals can then
be transmitted and sent to circuitry designed to carry out these
commands through the use of microprocessors and electro-mechanical
devices.  This invention describes the use of the EDI; along with
voice digitizing circuitry, a microprocessor and electro-mechanical
devices; to recognize voice commands from specific individuals and to
carry out both simple and complex tasks called for by theses
commands.  These task could include:  open/close the door in a house,
set the thermostat up or back, turn on/off the stove, turn on/off the
microwave, turn on/off the TV, mow the lawn, open/close the garage
door, open/close the car door, and hoist the sails on the boat.

      The Figure portrays the basic idea of the voice recognition
controller.  First, an individual speaks a command.  This command is
received and digitized based on the speakers voice phase, pitch, and
amplitude characteristics.  The digitized bit pattern passes into the
ICA where it enters the EDI pattern recognition circuitry.  The EDI
device includes two levels of pattern recognition.  The first level
of recognition uses a look-up table to verify that the speaker is
authorized to issue the command.  If the speaker is not authorized,
the command is rejected.  If the speaker is recognized, then the bit
pattern passes into the second level of recognition.  This second
bit-recognition level checks the command bit pattern using a look-up
table.  If the command bit-pattern is not included in the look-up
table, then the command is rejected.  If the command bit-pattern is
recognized, then the command bit-pattern recognition circuitry sends
a signal to a microprocessor control word look-up table.  From this
table, the EDI outputs the proper microprocessor control word to
activate electro-mechanical devices that actually carry out the
command.

      The key problem solved by this invention is that the ICA with
the EDI can be used for voice digitization recognition.  A primary
advantage for using the ICA and EDI for the voice recognition
controller is that the EDI can both interpret digitized voice
commands and drive the electro-mechanical devices in real time.  The
EDI allows a compact solution that will fit on a credit card size
circuit board.  Another advantage of the EDI is that it can be used
with voice recognition logic...