Browse Prior Art Database

Surveillance System Based on Active Radio Frequency Tag

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117612D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Walsh, BJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is an active Radio Frequency (RF) tag based surveillance system designed to combat theft of components (e.g., RAM) from Personal Computers (PCs) located in an office (or similar) environment.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Surveillance System Based on Active Radio Frequency Tag

      Disclosed is an active Radio Frequency (RF) tag based
surveillance system designed to combat theft of components (e.g.,
RAM) from Personal Computers (PCs) located in an office (or similar)
environment.

      Technology theft from PCs is becoming an ever increasing
problem.  Many office environments are subject to burglary and theft
of PCs/Mobiles/PC components.  At this moment, there are a number of
devices on the market place that act as deterrents but very few
actually monitor the fact that a PC is in situ and has not been
tampered with or opened.  This disclosure relates to the use of
radio-frequency technology to monitor and detect the presence or not
of items that have been identified by the application of active tags.

      Today's radio frequency technologies are permitting longer
detect and read ranges.  Ranges of between 8m and 25m are possible.
It is also possible to build radio frequency interrogators into a
variety of form factors.  One form factor in particular allows the
interrogator to reside in the ceiling of a building.  The
interrogator can monitor control/identify the quantity and the
identification numbers for a number of tags in a specified
area/range.

      The RF tags used to allow this interrogation are active
radio-frequency tags.  It is inherent in their design that active
tags require a battery to generate the extra power required to
transmit over an extended distance.  Today's active tags are built
with batteries as part of the overall unit.  The battery is fixed to
the tag.

      This disclosure details two alternative ways in which the
battery may be connected to the tag.  The first tag arrangement is
specific to PCs or other equipment that use battery-backed systems
and is split into two discrete segments:
  1.  The aerial and chip assembly (credit card shape/format) is
formed
       and "flying leads" used to make the interconnect to the
battery
       assembly.
  2.  The battery assembly is further split such there is a discrete
       contactor mechanism that is activ...