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Browse Prior Art Database

Recording Modifications to Stored Images

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117640D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 4 page(s) / 113K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jordan, RM: AUTHOR

Abstract

Available software packages such as Kodak PhotoCD*, allow modification of images for correction of image defects or for creative effects. Typical modifications are: filters performed on all or a defined part of the image, addition of graphical objects such as lines, shapes, free-hand drawn additions, or text, cropping, enlargement or reduction in size.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 47% of the total text.

Recording Modifications to Stored Images

      Available software packages such as Kodak PhotoCD*, allow
modification of images for correction of image defects or for
creative effects.  Typical modifications are:  filters performed on
all or a defined part of the image, addition of graphical objects
such as lines, shapes, free-hand drawn additions, or text, cropping,
enlargement or reduction in size.

      Increasingly, source images are taken from CD-ROM.  CD-ROM has
the great benefit that very large quantities of data, such as large
or high resolution images can be stored inexpensively, without
consuming hard disk space.  However, the medium is by definition
read-only.

      When an image taken from a CD-ROM is modified the user will
usually want to make a permanent copy of the modified image.
Typically, they would not want to destroy the original image.  If
this is taken from CD-ROM, this is in any case not possible as it is
a read-only medium.

      Using today's packages, the user will have to save the entire
modified image to hard disk, even though it may be very large and
differ from the original image only by a few modifications.

      A similar problem arises if the user wants to modify a hard
disk copy of an original image which is in some way precious; for
example, a scanned image of an original document which is lost or no
longer available to the user for rescanning.

      The described solution defines a new type of image file format.
This format contains two types of information:
  o  Pointer(s) to other image files in conventional formats already
      supported by the package, e.g., TIFF, etc..  These files may be
      located either on read-only media, i.e., CD-ROM, or read-write
      media, i.e., hard disk.
  o  Operations performed on the image.  Each operation will consist
      of a locus (a description of the geometric region within which
      the operation is to be performed), the type of operation, and
any
      parameters associated with that operation.  Ideally, the locus
      will be defined in a resolution independent coordinate system,
      e.g., percentage of the entire image, or a value from 0.0 to
1.0.
     This is called an 'Image Delta format'.

      For implementation purposes, this file format will obviously
require binary encoding, but for the purpose of description, a text
format is used.

      For example, here is a representation of an image which has
been loaded from Kodak PhotoCD, within which a portion of the image
has been high-pass filtered, and which has been cropped, darkened at
the top, and a red circle drawn onto it.  Lines are numbered for
identification in the subsequent explanation.
     01  (image)
     02    D:\PCD\IMAGES\IMG00001.PCD
     03  (operation)
     04    (locus)
     05    rectangle 0.55 0.65 0.45 0.56
     06    (operation type)
     0...