Browse Prior Art Database

Digital Signal Processor Modem for Multiple Telephone Lines

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117649D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 86K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Heybruck, WF: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a single modem that can adapt to multiple communication lines. Through the use of a multitasking Digital Signal Processor (DSP), multiple types of lines can be handled simultaneously.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Digital Signal Processor Modem for Multiple Telephone Lines

      Disclosed is a single modem that can adapt to multiple
communication lines.  Through the use of a multitasking Digital
Signal Processor (DSP), multiple types of lines can be handled
simultaneously.

      Current modem adapters use single purpose ASICS and CODECs or
DSPs to adapt computers to telephone lines for digital communication.
If a user wishes to adapt to multiple telco lines or other modes of
telecommunication (e.g., ISDN, SDLC, etc.), additional modem or
adapter cards are required.

      The MWAVE multi-line telephone modem eliminates the need for
multiple cards and multiple versions of software.  This modem
consists of a card containing the MWAVE digital signal processor that
plugs into a personal computer.  The current processor has the
capability of communicating with 2 Analog Interface Circuits
otherwise known as codecs.  Codecs are the devices that convert
analog signals into digital signals so that DSPs can process the
data.  Since this DSP is also multi-tasking it is capable of running
the same application program for each of the serial ports.  Future
MWAVE processors that may have more AICs and thruput can support
additional telco lines simultaneously.

      The diagram above illustrates how the current MWAVE processor
can be configured to operate with two of four line types
simultaneously.

      Should those ports be wired to separate codecs that are in turn
wired to separate telephone interfaces (Data Access Arrangements
(DAAs)), it is possible to process information from both lines
simultaneously.

      Given that these DAAs are also designed to support multiple of
the various types of telephone lines, it is possible to envision this

DSP connected to different computer systems over different types of
telephone interfaces.

      Given a tree of telephone interfaces as illustrated in the
Figure, the DSP through the application can select which interface it
needs to support the...