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Browse Prior Art Database

Stroke Identification with Embedded Coding

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117675D
Original Publication Date: 1996-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hanson, G: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method providing the display of an encoded sequence of dots and dashes (or short and long dashes) following the movement of an electronic pen along the tablet of a pen-based system. The encoded sequence provides additional information, while the textual or graphical meaning of the line drawn by the user is retained.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 83% of the total text.

Stroke Identification with Embedded Coding

      Disclosed is a method providing the display of an encoded
sequence of dots and dashes (or short and long dashes) following the
movement of an electronic pen along the tablet of a pen-based system.
The encoded sequence provides additional information, while the
textual or graphical meaning of the line drawn by the user is
retained.

      Fig. 1 shows the pattern of dots, dashes, and spaces
representing the name "John Doe" in Morse code.

      Fig. 2 shows the application of the pattern of Fig. 1 to the
letter "J," as drawn by the user, starting from the top.

      As shown in the example of Fig. 2, this method may be used to
interrupt the line representing an individual pen movement, providing
a representation of the user's name in Morse code.  This method may
be applied only to the signature of the user, or it may be applied to
all lines drawn by a particular user.

      This information is applied, for example, by an application
controlling the "inking" of lines to indicate pen movements.  The
operation of this feature may be controlled in concert with various
security measures, requiring, for example, the user to enter a
password before activating the encoding feature allowing the
presentation of dots  and dashes.  A number of different codes may be
provided for use by a number of different users, so that their
individual contributions to a  jointly developed drawing can be
recognized.

     ...