Browse Prior Art Database

Design for Retaining and Showing the Status of Committed Install Plans

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117738D
Original Publication Date: 1996-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 4 page(s) / 140K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bunce, J: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a design for allowing network administrators to retain and view the objects that were part of an install plan object past the time the plan was committed. This design also allows administrators to view the status of committed plans and workstations directly from the committed object, rather than just through a top-level Status dialog object.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 38% of the total text.

Design for Retaining and Showing the Status of Committed Install Plans

      Disclosed is a design for allowing network administrators to
retain and view the objects that were part of an install plan object
past the time the plan was committed.  This design also allows
administrators to view the status of committed plans and workstations
directly from the committed object, rather than just through a
top-level Status dialog object.

      The burdens on network administrators have been rapidly growing
both in volume and in complexity.  Chief among them is the need for
administrators to easily plan and execute the installation and
configuration of software products on a group of workstation on a
LAN.  This design for retaining committed plan objects and displaying
their status can be used with any network planning, installation, and
configuration program.

      A network installation program in this design will allow
administrators to create install plan objects which are composed of
one or more applications and one or more workstations.  (The
workstations may be organized into groups as well.)  An install plan
is the administrator's design for installing or configuring a set of
applications on a set of workstations.  When the administrator has
finished adding and customizing all the objects in an install plan,
the administrator can validate the plan to insure that all the
attributes are valid and commit the plan to generate the physical
files from the objects and their attributes.  These files would
include response, LAN CID Utility (LCU), and other plan-backing
files.  After a successful commit, the administrator would use these
files for the actual installation and configuration of the
applications on the set of workstations.

      In other designs, once the plan was committed, the plan object
and its child objects would be deleted.  The status of the plan, such
as the success or failure of installations on workstations in the
plan, could be obtained from a status dialog at another level of the
network installation container.  However, it can be disconcerting for
the administrator to have the plan and its objects disappear after
the commit process ended successfully.  It can also be cumbersome for
the administrator to go to one location to open the status of all the
plans and navigate through all the plan status to get to the plan of
interest.
  o  Behavior of Committed Plan Objects
       This design provides a solution to these two problems by
      first changing the behavior of committed plans.  Visually, the
      icons of all objects in the committed plan, including the
      committed plan itself, will have a special overlay icon to
      visually indicate to the administrator that the plan has been
      committed and is different than the other uncommitted plans.
      Administrators cannot drag objects from a committed plan to any
      other container in the...