Browse Prior Art Database

Onboard Vehicle Warning Device Using Radio Frequency Communication from External Sources near Points of Danger

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117742D
Original Publication Date: 1996-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kane, WF: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Proposed is a design to provide a unique visual or audible signal to drivers of trucks, cars, buses, trains, boats and planes to alert operators to approaching dangers in their path. Typical examples of such danger are railroad crossings, road construction sites, very sharp turns, areas of road flooding or missing pavement etc.. In addition, high towers, mountains and shallow water pose dangers to planes and ships respectively. The warning is implemented by the use of RF tranceivers or radio transmitters permanently located, for example, within 50-500 feet of the impending danger zone, the distance depending on the type of danger. For railroad crossings, for example, the warning transmitter can be activated by way of the block signal system. With no train in the block, the transmitter is not activated.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 60% of the total text.

Onboard Vehicle Warning Device Using Radio Frequency Communication
from External Sources near Points of Danger

      Proposed is a design to provide a unique visual or audible
signal to drivers of trucks, cars, buses, trains, boats and planes to
alert operators to approaching dangers in their path.  Typical
examples of such danger are railroad crossings, road construction
sites, very sharp turns, areas of road flooding or missing pavement
etc..  In addition, high towers, mountains and shallow water pose
dangers to planes and ships respectively.  The warning is implemented
by the use of RF tranceivers or radio transmitters permanently
located, for example, within 50-500 feet of the impending danger
zone, the distance depending on the type of danger.  For railroad
crossings, for example, the warning transmitter can be activated by
way of the block signal system.  With no train in the block, the
transmitter is not activated.  At construction sites, the warning
transmitter can operate cw or pulsed at suitable intervals to assure
communication with every passing vehicle.  Other examples for
transmitter placement for planes include elevated sites, towers,
skyscrapers, bridges, ground service vehicles, runway intersections.

      The transmitter signal is received by an RF tag or other RF
receiver located within the vehicle.  The tag or receiver is
interfaced with a warning device such as a special dashboard or
control panel light or audio generator such as a piez...