Browse Prior Art Database

Stationary Cursor Inside a Popup Menu

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117758D
Original Publication Date: 1996-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bardon, D: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Popup menus and tool palettes are commonly used controls in graphical user interfaces. The user places the cursor on an object, invokes the menu or palette (typically by clicking mouse button 2), then moves the mouse cursor to a choice and clicks on it. At the end of this sequence, the user has moved the mouse cursor away from the point where the menu or palette was invoked. The cursor may now be on another object and the user typically returns it to the starting position.

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Stationary Cursor Inside a Popup Menu

      Popup menus and tool palettes are commonly used controls in
graphical user interfaces.  The user places the cursor on an object,
invokes the menu or palette (typically by clicking mouse button 2),
then moves the mouse cursor to a choice and clicks on it.  At the end
of this sequence, the user has moved the mouse cursor away from the
point where the menu or palette was invoked.  The cursor may now be
on another object and the user typically returns it to the starting
position.

      The present invention is a technique for navigating to choices
in a popup menu or tool palette without changing the mouse cursor
position on the desktop.

      When the user pops up a menu or palette, mouse movements will
be translated into movement of the menu or palette rather than
movement of the mouse cursor.  Moving the mouse up (away from the
user) for example, causes the menu to move downward so that the
cursor is positioned above items higher in the menu.  When the user
chooses a menu item, the cursor is in the original position (Fig. 1).

      Movement in the x axis, likewise, will open cascade menus
(Fig. 2).

      The desktop will be treated as a virtual workspace larger than
the monitor so the menus can extend past the edge of the screen, if
necessary, just as windows can be dragged wholly or partly off the
screen today.