Browse Prior Art Database

Real-Time Adapter Reconfiguration to Accommodate Different Network Speeds

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117767D
Original Publication Date: 1996-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 80K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hershey, PC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This invention discloses methods for the detection of network speeds and allows real time adapter reconfiguration based on the network speed sensed by using the Event Driven Interface (EDI) invention described in (*).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Real-Time Adapter Reconfiguration to Accommodate Different Network
Speeds

      This invention discloses methods for the detection of network
speeds and allows real time adapter reconfiguration based on the
network speed sensed by using the Event Driven Interface (EDI)
invention described in (*).

      The Figure shows a specific example of a token ring network.
There are four stations on a four megabits per second token ring
network.  They are not all set to the same speed.  For example, the
transmission speed of station 1, station 2, and station 3 is set to
four megabits per second.  The transmission speed of station 4 is set
to 16 megabits per second.  A first problem occurs when station 4
tries to insert onto the four megabit per second ring.  The nature of
this problem is that station 4 could possibly disable all of the
other stations on the ring and still not be able to insert onto the
ring itself.

      Some existing token ring network technology includes built in
safeguards for preventing stations from being knocked off token rings
by other inappropriately configured stations.  However, not all token
ring adapters, especially legacy equipment, include such technology.
Assume that station 4 lacks this safeguard technology.  Then, the
user must reconfigure station 4 with a different transmission speed
before attempting to insert this station onto the token ring.  The
reconfiguration process requires rebooting station 4 and using a
special reference diskette in order to change the network
transmission speed from 16 megabits per second to 4 megabits per
second.

      When this process is complete, the user can safely insert
station 4 onto the 4 megabits per second ring.  The costs associated
with this process are time, inconvenience, and an increased potential
for user mistakes.  For example, the user must first find the
reference diskette and place it in diskette drive.  Then the user
must run the change con...