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Browse Prior Art Database

Shock Caps for Personal Computer Memory Card International Association Drives

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117768D
Original Publication Date: 1996-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 4 page(s) / 122K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fracek, TP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed are removable polymer end caps that will provide high-shock protection and prevent debris from damaging the connector of Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA) drives.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Shock Caps for Personal Computer Memory Card International Association
Drives

      Disclosed are removable polymer end caps that will provide
high-shock protection and prevent debris from damaging the connector
of Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA)
drives.

      The PCMCIA market is imposing conditions on hardfiles that have
not been considered before.  The drives are expected to be treated by
users as if they were 3 1/2-inch floppies.  Original specifications
are calling for a 30-inch unpackaged drop onto a vinyl floor.  No
company has demonstrated a product that can withstand this test to
date.

      The PCMCIA specification committee is considering two possible
modifications to the 30-inch specification; the first is to drop the
file onto a carpeted surface and the second is to drop the file in a
"protective pouch" onto the vinyl floor.  The point here is that the
30-inch drop requirement is extremely aggressive and that there is
going to be room for interpretation and maneuvering with respect to
this marketing feature.

      Several companies outside the disk drive industry are offering
protective pouches.  They range from the simple vinyl pouch
(calculator covers), to jeweler boxes (CD and music cassette boxes)
to water-tight rubber-bumpered cases three times the size of the
file.  A large volume of the PCMCIA drives are going to be sold
directly to the consumer off the shelf.  Drive makers are going to
have to develop presentation packaging that not only markets the
product but also protects it during shipment.  It would be beneficial
if part of this package would be used by the consumer after the sale
to protect it, thus reducing field return costs and improving
customer acceptance of this storage medium.

      The biggest challenge in solving this problem is to make a
device that the customer will diligently use.  It must be simple,
inexpensive, convenient, and allow the customer to store multiple
units in a small space efficiently.  The simpler the better.  The
above mentioned solutions do not meet all of these requirements.  The
calculator pouch is not suitable for storing multiple units, may not
provide very reliable shock protection, and is awkward for the
customer to use.  This means that the product must be completely
removed from the pouch prior to use and when the file needs to be
stored, the case must be searched for and located.  If it cannot be
found right away, the hard file was probably stored as is, similar to
the fate of many music cassettes.  The jew...