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Barberpole Bias for Flux Guided Orthogonal Magnetoresistive/Giant Magnetoresistive Sensor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117772D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gill, HS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Magnetoresistive (MR) sensor with sense current flowing perpendicular to the air bearing surface has important benefits. One very attractive benefit is that in this configuration, since only one sense lead is exposed at the air bearing surface, the air bearing surface could be electrically grounded, thus eliminating the electrical shorting problem between the sensor and the shields caused by metal smear at the air bearing surface. Since current is flowing perpendicular to the air bearing surface, the magnetic field from this current, which is parallel to the air bearing surface, does not help to achieve desirable bias point either for anisotropic magnetoresistive sensor or spin valve sensor. Therefore, an additional bias conductor is normally incorporated to achieve proper bias point.

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Barberpole Bias for Flux Guided Orthogonal Magnetoresistive/Giant
Magnetoresistive Sensor

      Magnetoresistive (MR) sensor with sense current flowing
perpendicular to the air bearing surface has important benefits.  One
very attractive benefit is that in this configuration, since only one
sense lead is exposed at the air bearing surface, the air bearing
surface could be electrically grounded, thus eliminating the
electrical shorting problem between the sensor and the shields caused
by metal smear at the air bearing surface.  Since current is flowing
perpendicular to the air bearing surface, the magnetic field from
this current, which is parallel to the air bearing surface, does not
help to achieve desirable bias point either for anisotropic
magnetoresistive sensor or spin valve sensor.  Therefore, an
additional bias conductor is normally incorporated to achieve proper
bias point.  The incorporation of this bias conductor complicates the
manufacturing process.

      A self-biased structure which utilizes BARBERPOLE bias scheme
is shown in the Figure.  The conductor contacts provide current flow
which is canted away from the magnetic easy axis of the sensor thus
achieving required linearization for read back signal.  In addition,
the magnetic material under the front contact acts as the FLUX GUIDE
for the sensor.