Browse Prior Art Database

Identification and Verification of Signatures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117803D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 6 page(s) / 222K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gungl, K: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to identify a person by verifying the signature. The signature is captured using a touch-sensitive device and compared against a given reference signature. The verification can be done offline without additional host computer communication. Thus, it offers a simple, efficient and accepted way for personal identification.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 28% of the total text.

Identification and Verification of Signatures

      Disclosed is a method to identify a person by verifying the
signature.  The signature is captured using a touch-sensitive device
and compared against a given reference signature.  The verification
can be done offline without additional host computer communication.
Thus, it offers a simple, efficient and accepted way for personal
identification.

      For point-of-sale transactions, it is usually required to
verify the identity of a person and the validity of a presented card.
In security applications, there is the demand to identify a person
before giving access to rooms, data or service.  With the increasing
availability of cards with increased storage capacity like smart
cards (which are able to store information on a chip instead of a
magnetic stripe), the possibility for multiple applications on a
single card arrives.  All of these require a simple, efficient and
accepted way for identifying the card holder to verify the
transaction.  Up to now, the most frequently used solution is a
secret Personal Identification Number (PIN), which has to be entered
by the person owning the card.  If the PIN is lost or stolen, it is
very easy to misuse the card, because there is no real personal
identification in this scheme.  Other methods for identification
include fingerprint recognition, voice recognition, face recognition,
retina recognition and more.  All of these methods require expensive
hardware and most of them are of a low cultural acceptance.

      The solution described here is simple because it requires only
a minor change in transaction processing.  It is efficient because no
additional host computer connection is required and the verification
can be done offline.  The hardware required is technically simple and
cheap.  The acceptance of this method is very high because the
signature is already accepted for personal verification and has been
in use for a long time.

      The solution consists of three components:  1) the signature
capture device 2) the signature reference and 3) the signature
comparison.

Signature Comparison

      There are generally two ways to verify a signature:  static and
dynamic verification.  The dynamic verification uses a special pen
with built in sensors and uses data sampled during the creation of
the signature for verification.  The static approach uses only the
image of the complete signature and needs only a single version of
the reference signature for comparison.

      Because the reference signature for the signature comparison
described above requires less space than the image of the signature
itself, it can easily be stored in the storage of a smart card.  The
reference data may be derived from a single or several signatures.
These signatures may be captured from paper as an image.  Thus, the
smart card can be customized with the necessary data without the need
for the person to give a signature using a sp...