Browse Prior Art Database

Object-Oriented Response File Processing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117831D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 4 page(s) / 17K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ibanez, JG: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

With the growing number of competitive network operating systems (for example, Microsoft Windows NT*), we need to protect our technology of Configuration/Installation files.

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Object-Oriented Response File Processing

With the growing number of competitive network operating systems (for example, Microsoft Windows NT*), we need to protect our technology of Configuration/Installation files.

Parsing and accessing key=value user options nested within sections of a response file are tedious and complicated tasks that each install program needs to handle in order to be Configuration, Installation, and Distribution (CID) enabled. The problem is compounded by the de-facto end-user practice of editing together response files from different products forcing each installer to wrap his information within a named section, thereby adding to the complexity of the file and its parsing.

This problem is solved using a RESPONSEFILE object to access user options from a response file.

Currently, there is no generic solution for manipulating a response file. This disclosure describes a generic programming interface to response files. The programming interface would be an asset to the Toolkit. It would help anyone who needs to develop and interact with response files. Protecting this interface would ensure that it stays royalty free.

When a program needs to access information from a response file, it instantiates a RESPONSEFILE object passing the fully qualified file name to the constructor method (Fig. 1). ResponseFile *pResponseFile = new

ResponseFile("\\my\\response.fil");

The program must subsequently invoke the Read method which performs the parsing of the file into RESPONSEFILESECTION (Fig. 2) objects. pResponseFile->Read();

Subsequent to the Read,the program can:

Query user options from the RESPONSEFILE.

char *pszMyValue;

pszMyValue = pResponseFile->QueryValue("keyname",0);

/* access the value associated with "keyname" from the main sec

pszMyValue = pResponseFile->QueryValue("keyname",2,"my_section", /* access the value associated with "keyname" from the section

"my_nest" which is imbedded within the section named "my_sect

Set (change,add, or remove) key,value pairs ' pResponseFile->SetValue("keyname","newvalue",0); /* set ("keyname","newvalue") pair in the main section */ pResponseFile->SetValue("keyname","newvalue",2,"my_section","my_n

1

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/* set the value associated with "keyname" to "newvalue" in the

* named "my_nest" which is imbedded within the section named "m

*/

pResponseFile->SetValue("keyname",NULL,0);

/* remove the value associated with "keyname" from the main sec

Access the accessor of the main sections' RESPONSEFILESECTION

object, and utilize any of the RESPONSEFILESECTION methods.

ResponseFileSection *pMainSection;

pMainSection = pResponseFile->get_pMainSection();

pMainSection->RemoveAll(TRUE); /* remove all options from the

...

Change the file name

pResponseFile->set_pszFilename("d:\\my\\new\\resp.fil");

Save to ascii file with response file syntax.

pResponseFile->Write();

A RESPONSEFILE is an object which provides access to key=value

information stored within a response file.

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