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Browse Prior Art Database

Color Image Quantization Algorithm for Three Dimension Displays Based on Ordered Dither Method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117839D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 80K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Miyazawa, A: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a new color image quantization algorithm specifically for stereoscopic image display systems that use a lenticular array (an array of cylindrical lenslets) and a high-resolution color Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) panel. In quantizing the original true-color (24 or more bits per pixel) Three Dimension (3D) images on the LCD panel, our algorithm optimizes the appearance of the resulting color images.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Color Image Quantization Algorithm for Three Dimension Displays Based
on Ordered Dither Method

      Disclosed is a new color image quantization algorithm
specifically for stereoscopic image display systems that use a
lenticular array (an array of cylindrical lenslets) and a
high-resolution color Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) panel.  In
quantizing the original true-color (24 or more bits per pixel) Three
Dimension (3D) images on the LCD panel, our algorithm optimizes the
appearance of the resulting color images.

      Overall, alignment of the lenticular array with the LCD panel
is a key to stereoscopic image displays of this sort.  In a color TFT
display, each pixel consists of three subpixels that define its red,
green, and blue components, as shown in Fig. 1.  The lenticular array
is positioned on the surface of the LCD panel in such a way that each
lenslet corresponds to two columns of subpixels (Fig. 2).  This
approach is the most suitable for the system, because it takes
advantage of the LCD panel's high resolution.  In the above method of
aligning the array, assign each subpixel, not each pixel, to a left-
or right-eye image alternately.  For the left eye, only the green
values can be shown for pixels in even-numbered columns, while only
the red-and-blue values can be shown for pixels in odd-numbered
columns; for the right eye, the reverse is true.  Thus, when two
images (one for each eye) are composed into a stereo image, a pixel
in the resulting image whose x-coordinate is even takes its green
value from the corresponding pixel in the left image, its red value
from the corresponding pixel in the right image, and its blue value
from the average of two pixels in the right image:  the corresponding
pixel and the one after it.  A pixel whose x-coordinate is odd takes
its green value from the corresponding pixel in the right image, its
blue value from the corresponding pixel in the left image, and its
red value from the average of two pixels in the left image:  the
corresponding...